Program #604

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE POSTMARKS . . . . . No One Said This Would Be Easy . . . . . Memoirs at the End of the World (Dig)
NANCY SINATRA . . . . . You Only Live Twice . . . . . The Hit Years
LAURIE JOHNSON . . . . . The Avengers Theme . . . . . With a Vengeance
MIKE REDWAY . . . . . Have No Fear Bond Is Here . . . . . Have No Fear Bond Is Here
THE BONZO DOG BAND . . . . . Hunting Tigers Out In ‘INDIAH’ . . . . . Cornology [3CD Set]
DON MCLEAN . . . . . On The Amazon . . . . . Don McLean
THE KINKS . . . . . Apeman . . . . . Lola versus Powerman and the Money-Go-Round, Part One
FIREWATER . . . . . Borneo . . . . . The Golden Hour
JEFFERSON AIRPLANE . . . . . She Has Funny Cars . . . . . Surrealistic Pillow

PETER & GORDON . . . . . A World Without Love . . . . . The British Invasion: History of British Rock, Vol. 1
CAMERA OBSCURA . . . . . Away With Murder . . . . . My Maudlin Career
ROD STEWART . . . . . You Wear It Well . . . . . Never a Dull Moment
THE PRETENDERS . . . . . Message Of Love . . . . . Pretenders II
SPOON . . . . . Got Nuffin . . . . . Got Nuffin
BIG STAR . . . . . You Get What You Deserve . . . . . #1 Record/Radio City
MOJAVE 3 . . . . . Kill The Lights . . . . . Puzzles Like You
THE PERNICE BROTHERS . . . . . Subject Drop . . . . . Discover a Lovelier You
PETER & GORDON . . . . . I Go To Pieces . . . . . The British Invasion: History of British Rock, Vol. 3

LEMON JELLY . . . . . Spacewalk . . . . . Lost Horizons
AIR . . . . . Do The Joy . . . . . Do The Joy
10CC . . . . . I’m Not In Love . . . . . The Original Soundtrack
ST. VINCENT . . . . . Just The Same But Brand New . . . . . Actor
BRIAN ENO . . . . . The Big Ship . . . . . Another Green World
BECK . . . . . Movie Theme . . . . . The Information
SUPER FURRY ANIMALS . . . . . Cardiff In The Sun . . . . . Dark Days/Light Years

VIVIAN GIRLS . . . . . When I’m Gone . . . . . When I'm Gone
RED BALL JETS . . . . . Stars Are Right . . . . . Rockin EP
YO LA TENGO . . . . . Today Is The Day . . . . . Today Is The Day
STILL LIFE STILL . . . . . Pastel . . . . . Pastel EP
FOUR VOLTS . . . . . Sunday Night . . . . . Triple Your Work Force
RICHARD X. HEYMAN . . . . . All For The Girl . . . . . Living Room!!
MARSHALL CRENSHAW . . . . . T.M.D. . . . . . #447
BUDDY HOLLY . . . . . I’m Gonna Love You Too . . . . . Buddy Holly
THE SHANGRI-LAS . . . . . Give Him A Great Big Kiss . . . . . The Best of the Girl Groups, Vol. 1

This one opened with a track from the upcoming Postmarks disc that sounds like a soundtrack song for a movie that hasn't been made yet, perhaps something in an action/thriller/espianoge vein. Of course, last year they covered the theme song for You Only Live Twice, but here we heard the original from Nancy Sinatra. Then it was the great theme by Laurie Johnson from the old Avengers TV show followed by one more Bond theme, this time from the original Casino Royale—the bastard child of James Bond movies, but one that I have a soft spot for in my heart. Mike Redway is the man singing, and his idiosyncratic way with a lyric brought to mind an old Bonzo Dog Band tune, which succeeded in hijacking this set and setting off in a totally different direction. So we had Don McLean covering a lyrically playful tune from an old 1920s British musical feeding into the Kinks' looking to get back to their natural roots, and that brought on Firewater's Tod A. explaining why he had to travel halfway around the world to clear his mind set to a rhythm that conjured up an old Jefferson Airplane tune featuring Spencer Dryden pounding out something similar on the drums.

Gordon Waller passed away recently; he was 64 and suffered from heart disease. Along with Peter Asher, they were the first British act in 1964 to hit the top of the charts after the Beatles earlier that year kicked off what eventually became known as the British Invasion. For the next couple of years Peter & Gordon had a pretty successful run, benefitting from Paul McCartney's relationship with Asher's sister Jane by recording a number of McCartney tunes that the Beatles had rejected. Such was the case with the track that opened this set, which was their first single and topped the American charts in late June of 1964. The closer here was their remake of a Del Shannon track, which I happen to prefer to the original. In between one from Camera Obscura's latest that has a little of that British Invasion feel, and the bit about putting thoughts down in a letter brought on Rod Stewart attempting to make amends by doing the same. The Pretenders followed with their own missive, and then it was the new one from Spoon bringing on Big Star with something of a philosophical reply, which in turn led to a couple of three-minute pop songs from Mojave 3 and the Pernice Brothers.

This section began with one from Lemon Jelly that didn't make it into the last program, mostly because it's about walking in space, as opposed to on the Moon. Splitting hairs I know, but sometimes that's the way it works. The first track made available from the upcoming Air release followed, and part of the refrain on that one brought to mind an old favorite from 10cc. The dream-like tone was carried forward by St. Vincent into one of those Brian Eno tunes with a title that perfectly suits the sounds that go with it (he does that a lot). From there we finished with a hazy one from Beck leading to a lovely bit of 21st-century psychedelia from Super Furry Animals.

Vivian Girls are a trio of women from Brooklyn who reach back to the Ramones crossed with the Shangri-las for much of their sound; they have a new album on the horizon and we heard the first track that's been put out there for consumption. From there it was a trio of EPs, starting with the Red Ball Jets, a band from Milwaukee who had some regional success some 30 years ago, and they were followed by Yo La Tengo with a rocking version of a tune that first appeared on their Summer Sun disc. One more from an EP brought a new song with some good energy from Still LIfe Still, and then it was Four Volts with a track that always calls to mind an old Richard X Heyman tune. The tone shifted in more of a pop direction with Marshall Crenshaw, who once upon a time played Buddy Holly in a movie, and then we completed the circle with the Shangri-las.

Here's another one from Peter & Gordon


Program #603

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE KING OF FRANCE . . . . . Moon . . . . . The King of France
JONATHAN KING . . . . . Everyone’s Gone To The Moon . . . . . The British Invasion: History of British Rock, Vol. 7
NICK DRAKE . . . . . Pink Moon . . . . . Pink Moon
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Blue Moon . . . . . Self Portrait
ELVIS PRESLEY . . . . . Blue Moon Of Kentucky . . . . . Complete Sun Sessions
VAN MORRISON . . . . . Once In A Blue Moon . . . . . What's Wrong with This Picture?
DR. JOHN . . . . . Creole Moon . . . . . Creole Moon
M. WARD . . . . . Half Moon . . . . . End of Amnesia
NEKO CASE . . . . . I Wish I Was The Moon . . . . . Blacklisted (Original Recording Remastered)
THE MINUS 5 . . . . . Big Beat Up Moon . . . . . Killingsworth
TINDERSTICKS . . . . . Waiting For The Moon . . . . . Waiting for the Moon
CAT POWER . . . . . The Moon . . . . . The Greatest
FRANK SINATRA . . . . . Fly Me To The Moon . . . . . Nothing But The Best
THE DUKES OF STRATOSPHEAR . . . . . Bike Ride To The Moon . . . . . Chips from the Chocolate Fireball
THE SATURN FIVE . . . . . Voyage Around The Moon . . . . . That Thing You Do!: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
LOTHAR & THE HAND PEOPLE . . . . . Space Hymn . . . . . Space Hymn/Presenting...Lothar & The Hand People
THE BYRDS . . . . . Armstrong, Aldrin And Collins . . . . . Ballad of Easy Rider
FRANK BORMAN . . . . . Sounds Of The Space Age . . . . . From Sputnik To Lunar Landing

FRANK BORMAN . . . . . Sounds Of The Space Age . . . . . From Sputnik To Lunar Landing
THE POLICE . . . . . Walking On The Moon . . . . . Vol. 2-Tighten Up
JOYA LANDIS . . . . . Moonlight Lover . . . . . Vol. 2-Tighten Up
THE BONZO DOG BAND . . . . . Tubas In The Moonlight . . . . . Cornology [3CD Set]
DUBROVKA TOMSIC . . . . . Moonlight Sonata . . . . . The Best Of Beethoven
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . Moonlight Mile . . . . . Sticky Fingers
THE BEATLES . . . . . Mr. Moonlight . . . . . Beatles For Sale (Remastered)
HERMAN’S HERMITS . . . . . Mr. Moonshine Man . . . . . Very Best of Herman's Hermits
THE RAMONES . . . . . Howling At The Moon . . . . . Ramones Mania
CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL . . . . . Bad Moon Rising . . . . . Chronicle, Vol. 1: The 20 Greatest Hits
TELEVISION . . . . . Marquee Moon . . . . . Marquee Moon
JENIFER JACKSON . . . . . Mercury, The Sun And Moon . . . . . Birds
FEDIRICO AUBELE . . . . . Luna y Sol . . . . . Causes 2
BRIAN ENO . . . . . An Ending (Ascent) . . . . . Another Green World

Although it wasn't originally the plan, this show ended up being completely geared to the 40th anniversary of man landing and walking on the Moon, which happened on July 20, 1969. There were simply too many good songs that incorporate the Moon in their lyrics, making it too difficult to choose only a dozen or so upon which to build a portion of the program. So we made the command decision to go for the full show, and even then I barely scratched the surface of available tunes, althouugh I was happy with the overall mix after it was complete.

It also gave me an opportunity to pull out a flexidisc that came in my December 1969 copy of National Geographic. On it Frank Borman—who was the commander on Apollo 8, the first mission that sent men to the Moon in December of 1968—narrates the story of the Space Age, starting with the launch of Sputnik in 1957 and ending with Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walking on the Moon. Neither an especially comprehensive nor the most riveting history of this time period, I still enjoyed throwing it in there as something that was both more than a little out of the ordinary and timely. As a freeform station LDR has the freedom to do something like that, not to mention using one of the major accomplishments of the 20th century as inspirationfor an entire program. That's what keeps it fun and interesting for me, and I hope it works in the same fashion for you as well.

Here's Neil Armstrong first setting foot on the Moon


Program #602

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE SPECIALS . . . . . International Jet Set . . . . . More Specials
THE POSTMARKS . . . . . Go Jetsetter . . . . .
BLONDIE . . . . . Sunday Girl . . . . . Parallel Lines
BERTRAND BURGALAT . . . . . Ma Rencontre . . . . . The Sssound of Mmmusic
ANTONIO CARLOS JOBIM AND ELIS REGINA . . . . . Aguas de Marco (Waters Of March) . . . . . The Girl From Ipanema: The Antonio Carlos Jobim Songbook
LORENZO JOVANOTTI . . . . . Piove . . . . . The Sopranos - Peppers and Eggs: Music From The HBO Series
KRAFTWERK . . . . . Trans Europe Express . . . . . Trans-Europe Express

ARCTIC MONKEYS . . . . . Crying Lightning . . . . . Crying Lightning
CREAM . . . . . Tales Of Brave Ulysses) . . . . . Disraeli Gears
SUPERGRASS . . . . . Diamond Hoo Ha Man . . . . . Diamond Hoo Ha
ALICE COOPER . . . . . Under My Wheels . . . . . Killer
THE NEW YORK DOLLS . . . . . ’Cause I Sez So . . . . . 'Cause I Sez So
JARVIS COCKER . . . . . Angela . . . . . Further Complications
THE DEATHRAY DAVIES . . . . . A Calendar Crime . . . . . The Kick and the Snare
THE COCKTAIL SLIPPERS . . . . . Gotta Crush . . . . . Saint Valentine's Day Massacre
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN . . . . . Crush On You . . . . . The River
CAMERA OBSCURA . . . . . French Navy . . . . . My Maudlin Career

TIM BUCKLEY . . . . . Carnival Song . . . . . Goodbye and Hello
THE BEATLES . . . . . Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite . . . . . Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Remastered)
GROUCHO MARX . . . . . Lydia The Tattooed Lady . . . . . Demon in Disguise
ELVIS COSTELLO . . . . . Sulpher To Sugarcane . . . . . Secret, Profane and Sugarcane
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . Country Honk . . . . . Let It Bleed
RAMBLIN’ JACK ELLIOTT . . . . . Richland Woman Blues . . . . . A Stranger Here
MISSISSIPPI JOHN HURT . . . . . Candy Man . . . . . Revisited

WILCO . . . . . Sonny Feeling . . . . . Wilco (The Album)
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues . . . . . Highway 61 Revisited
FINIAN MCKEAN . . . . . Every Day That Passes . . . . . Shades Are Drawn
THE NATIONAL . . . . . So Far Around The Bend . . . . . Dark Was the Night
THE MINUS 5 . . . . . Scott Walker’s Fault . . . . . Killingsworth
SCOTT WALKER . . . . . Plastic Palace People . . . . . It's Raining Today: The Scott Walker Story (1967-70)

A new album from the Postmarks will be available in a little over a month; the disc's first single is a lot of fun, and it inspired a globetrotting opener that began with an old Specials tune about an especially perilous airplane flight. The Postmarks track reminded me of a favorite from Blondie, and Deborah Harry singing in French brought on some wonderful pop music from France by Bertrand Burgalat. From there we heard the sublime Bossa Nova sounds of Antonio Carlos Jobim and Elis Regina, which brought on Italy's Lorenzo Jovanotti with an atmospheric tune about love's rebirth. The transportation mode changed for the final track as Kraftwerk made their way across Europe.

Arctic Monkeys will also have a new disc at the end of August, and the first single is also quite appealing. I heard a bit of Cream in there, which was one of the bands they were listening to while making this new record, and then it was a Supergrass track from their last one that evokes a similar response for me. From there it was an old favorite from Alice Cooper bringing on one of the more New York Dolls-like tracks from that band's recent disc. Jarvis Cocker latest album supplied another great rocker, and then it was the Deathray Davies shifting the sound into slightly more of a pop direction. That trend continued with the Cocktail Slippers from their latest (produced by Steve Van Zandt) with a tune that quite naturally flows into an old Bruce Springsteen song (from a Steve Van Zandt co-produced record), which led to Camera Obscura pretty much expressing the same sentiments to finish it off.

As I've mentioned before, sometimes tunes appear in my brain from out of nowhere and stay on a continous loop; this time it was a very funny tune about a tattooed lady named Lydia that Groucho Marx first sang in the Marx Brothers picture At The Circus. Here we heard him at 81 singing it to conclude a Carnegie Hall performance from 1972 that consisted of him telling stories and singing songs from his life in show business. Carny-related tunes from Tim Buckley and the Beatles preceded Groucho, and following was a wonderful old David Bromberg track about a carnival dancing girl who proved irresistable to every man who saw her. The bawdiness of that one seemed to work well with the Elvis Costello tune that followed, and then it was the Rolling Stones with their country version of "Honky Tonk Woman" bringing on a couple of Mississippi John Hurt tunes—first by Ramblin' Jack Elliott from his recent release and then the old blues master himself recorded live at Oberlin College in 1965.

A new one from Wilco that expresses a certain sense of dislocation was followed by an old favorite from Bob Dylan. Then we heard Finian McKean documenting a downward spiral into one from the National that's very similar, both lyrically and musically. The Minus 5 attempting to pin it all on Scott Walker conjured up the man himself with one of his distinctive melodramas, which seemed a good a place as any to put this one to rest.

Here's another from Groucho Marx


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