Program #613

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
BILLY WARD & THE DOMINOES . . . . . Sixty Minute Man . . . . . Sixty Minute Men: The Best of Billy Ward & His Dominoes
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . Time Waits For No One . . . . . It's Only Rock 'N Roll
OASIS . . . . . I’m Outta Time . . . . . Dig Out Your Soul
MARAH . . . . . Old Time Ticking Away . . . . . Angels of Destruction
JOSEPH ARTHUR . . . . . Dream Of The Good Life . . . . . Crazy Rain
GEORGE HARRISON . . . . . Art Of Dying . . . . . All Things Must Pass [BOXED EDITION]

GIRLS . . . . . Lust For Life . . . . . Album
ART BRUT . . . . . Emily Kane . . . . . Bang Bang Rock & Roll
THE WHO . . . . . Pictures Of Lilly . . . . . Meaty Beaty Big and Bouncy
THE JAM . . . . . So Sad About Us . . . . . All Mod Cons
THE SUPREMES . . . . . You Can’t Hurry Love . . . . . Gold
GOD HELP THE GIRL . . . . . Come Monday Night . . . . . God Help The Girl
EELS . . . . . My Timing Is Off . . . . . Hombre Lobo: 12 Songs of Desire
TODD RUNDGREN . . . . . Couldn’t I Just Tell You . . . . . Something/Anything?
THE HOLLIES . . . . . Carrie Anne . . . . . Hollies - Hollies Greatest Hits
FARRAH . . . . . Life’s Too Short . . . . . Moustache
ROBERT JOHNSON . . . . . I’ll Be Waiting . . . . . Close Personal Friend

IGGY POP . . . . . Lust For Life . . . . . Lust for Life
BOBBY DARIN . . . . . Don’t Rain On My Parade . . . . . As Long as I'm Singing: The Bobby Darin Collection
NEW YORK DOLLS . . . . . ’Cause I Sez So . . . . . 'Cause I Sez So
MAGAZINE . . . . . Shot By Both Sides . . . . . Real Life
THE REPLACEMENTS . . . . . I’ll Be You . . . . . Don't Tell a Soul
NICK LOWE . . . . . Cracking Up . . . . . Labour of Lust
ROBYN HITCHCOCK & THE VENUS 3 . . . . . TLC . . . . . Goodnight Oslo
THE CLASH . . . . . The Right Profile . . . . . London Calling

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND . . . . . Jersey Girl . . . . . Live: 1975-85 (3CD)
THE BEATLES . . . . . Two Of Us . . . . . Let It Be (Remastered)
CAMERA OBSCURA . . . . . Let’s Get Out Of This Country . . . . .
THE KINKS . . . . . Holiday In Waikiki . . . . . Face to Face
ARLO GUTHRIE . . . . . Ukulele Lady . . . . . Hobo's Lullaby
LED KAAPANA & FRIENDS . . . . . Radio Hula . . . . . Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar Masters Collection, Vol. 2
DON HO . . . . . Tiny Bubbles . . . . . Don Ho - Greatest Hits
THE BEACH BOYS . . . . . Let’s Go Away For Awhile . . . . . Pet Sounds
THE POSTMARKS . . . . . Go Jetsetter . . . . . Memoirs at the End of the World (Dig)
THE GO-GO’S . . . . . Vacation . . . . . Vacation

Upon hearing of the recent demise of Don Hewitt, the first thing that surfaced in my brain was the tune from Billy Ward & the Dominoes that opened this show. From there we heard a trio of songs from the Rolling Stones, Oasis and Marah that at their core are all about the passage of time, and then Joseph Arthur introduced the element of life and death, which George Harrison expanded upon from the perspective of Eastern philosophy to put the finishing touches on this opener.

This section began with one from the upcoming disc by Girls that conjured up an Art Brut track that would undoubtedly make my list of favorite tracks from this first decade of the 21st century (if I managed to actually create such a list). Another song of unfullfilled longing followed from the Who, which led to the Jam covering a different Who track on love's ups and downs. The Supremes taking a philosophical approach (with a bassline borrowed by the Jam for "Town Called Malice") led to Stuart Murdoch's God Help The Girl and another track with a prominently soulful bass. Eels took us in more of a Pop direction with my favorite from the recent disc, which led to some magic of a similar nature from Todd Rundgren. Some late British Invasion bliss (with a steel drum solo!) from the Hollies led to Farrah, a band obviously influenced by that sound, and then it was Robert Johnson—not the iconic bluesman—from his only official disc, which came out in the late '70s and featured his hot guitar anchoring a set of terrific rock and roll tunes.

An obvious connection to the Girls track that opened the last set is the Iggy Pop tune that began this one, and following up on Mr. Pop's survival message we heard from Bobby Darin covering the song that Barbra Streisand forever took possesion of in Funny Girl. A bit of commentary on modern culture by the New York Dolls led to an early piece of claustrophobic alienation by Magazine, which brought on the Replacements suggesting a temporary personality exchange as an answer. Nick Lowe losing his grip was countered by Robyn Hitchcock and the Venus 3 with a pharmaceutical solution, which brought to mind the Clash and their consideration of the actor Montgomery Clift.

This program was the last to appear before I took a week's vacation down the Jersey Shore, so to help me get out the door we heard a bit of traveling music, starting with Bruce Springsteen's cover of a Tom Waits tune. One each from the Beatles and Camera Obscura maintained the mood, and then we heard a kind of mini-set-within-the-set that focused on Hawaii. (I've never been, but hope to get there on some future R&R expedition.) Here we heard the Kinks a bit disillusioned with what they found upon arriving; Arlo Guthrie with a lovely rendition of an old tune that dates back to the 1920's; some serene Hawaiian slack key guitar sounds from Led Kaapana and Friends; and a guilty pleasure from Don Ho, which never fails to bring a smile to my face and actually seemed to flow rather nicely into the Beach Boys instrumental that followed. Finally, a travel tune from the new Postmarks disc brought us to the Go-Go's with the obvious closer for this edition of Lucky Dog Radio.

Here's another one from the Go-Go's


Program #612

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
YO LA TENGO . . . . . Here To Fall . . . . . Popular Songs
BECK . . . . . Paper Tiger . . . . . Sea Change
JULIAN PLENTI . . . . . Fly As You Might . . . . . Julian Plenti Is Skyscraper
JOHN LENNON . . . . . Well Well Well . . . . . John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band
SPOON . . . . . Got Nuffin . . . . . Got Nuffin
WILCO . . . . . I’m The Man Who Loves You . . . . . Yankee Hotel Foxtrot

JAMES DICKINSON . . . . . Last Night I Gave Up Smoking . . . . . Free Beer Tomorrow
JERRY LEE LEWIS . . . . . What Made Milwaukee Famous (Has Made A Loser Out Of Me) . . . . . Killer Country
JOHN DOE & THE SADIES . . . . . A Fool Such As I . . . . . Country Club
GIANT SAND . . . . . Out There . . . . . proVISIONS
CAROLYN MARK & NQ ARBUCKLE . . . . . All Time Low . . . . . Let's Just Stay Here
EVAN DANDO & SABRINA BROOKE . . . . . Summer Wine . . . . . Total Lee! The Songs of Lee Hazlewood
KRIS KRISTOFFERSON . . . . . Loving Her Was Easier (Than Anything I’ll Ever Do Again) . . . . . The Essential Kris Kristofferson
ISOBEL CAMPBELL & MARK LANEGAN . . . . . The Flame That Burns . . . . . Sunday at Devil Dirt
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . Wild Horses . . . . . Sticky Fingers

JOE HENRY . . . . . Channel . . . . . Blood from Stars
ST. VINCENT . . . . . Save Me From What I Want . . . . . Actor
RADIOHEAD . . . . . These Are My Twisted Words . . . . . These Are My Twisted Words
JOY DIVISION . . . . . Heart And Soul . . . . . Closer
JOHN CALE . . . . . Heartbreak Hotel . . . . . Slow Dazzle
TINDERSTICKS . . . . . Yesterday’s Tomorrows . . . . . The Hungry Saw
SHARON JONES & THE DAP KINGS . . . . . Tell Me . . . . . 100 Days, 100 Nights
WILSON PICKETT . . . . . Midnight Hour . . . . . Wilson Pickett's Greatest Hits

DAVID BOWIE . . . . . Slip Away . . . . . Heathen
KNIGHT BERMAN, JR. . . . . . This Little Transistor . . . . . A Score For Tesla: Music from the film Megahertz
THE CARS . . . . . Moving In Stereo . . . . . The Cars
THE POSTMARKS . . . . . Don’t Know Till You Try . . . . . Memoirs at the End of the World (Dig)
THE BEACH BOYS . . . . . Hang On To Your Ego . . . . . Pet Sounds
MARIANNE FAITHFULL . . . . . Hold On Hold On . . . . . Easy Come, Easy Go
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Ballad Of A Thin Man . . . . . The Bootleg Series, Vol. 4: Bob Dylan Live, 1966: The "Royal Albert Hall Concert"

Kicking it off this time around was a track from the new Yo La Tengo disc that has a bit of a psychadelic feel and features some "Madman Across the Water" strings, much like the Beck tune that followed. Then we heard Julian Plenti from his new album with one that has some jagged electric guitar, which seemed to feed nicely into the stripped down rock of John Lennon from his first solo disc. Spoon took a similar approach for their latest track from a few months back, and the guitar on that one conjured up Wilco to finish off this opener.

James Dickinson passed away recently; he was a keyboard guy who in addition to releasing his own discs also produced some real fine records, most notably with Big Star and the Replacements. We heard a favorite from his 2002 album that bears a certain resemblance to a Jerry Lee Lewis tune, and from there it was John Doe & the Sadies with their take on a song that's probably most associated with Elvis. Giant Sand followed with one of Howe Gelb's dry, dusty desert tunes, which led to a new one with a similar feel from Carolyn Mark accompanied by the Canadian band NQ Arbuckle. One of the progenitors of this kind of sound was Lee Hazlewood; here we heard Evan Dando and Sabrina Brooke covering one of his classics, followed by Kris Kristofferson with one of his big ones from way back when.The mood was maintained by Isobel Campbell and Mark Lanegan, and then it was the Rolling Stones with Jim Dickinson on piano to close out this section.

The next set began in a disfunctional place with Joe Henry from his latest flowing into St. Vincent trying to keep her own best self-interest in mind. A new one from Radiohead that's set in the middle of a painful breakup was followed by Joy Division's Ian Curtis attempting to save his marriage. Then we heard John Cale's harrowing take on another song best associated with Elvis followed by Tindersticks realizing the fork in the road has been reached. The soulful sound on that one brought on Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings looking for a little reassurance, which Wilson Pickett was happy to provide.

The finale offered a lovely David Bowie tune to start that melded beautifully into a piece from Knight Berman, Jr.'s soundtrack to the film Megahertz. Then we heard the Cars with one of my favorites from their first disc, and the dislocation hinted at in that one was answered by the Postmarks from their terrific new disc. The Beach Boys followed with the original version of what eventually became "I Know There's An Answer" when Pet Sounds was completed, and then it was Marianne Faithfull covering a Neko Case tune that covers the same general territory bringing us to Bob Dylan  from the infamous 1966 show in Manchester, England, to bring down the curtain.

Here's another one from Spoon


Program #611

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
JIMI HENDRIX . . . . . The Star Spangled Banner . . . . . Music from the Original Soundtrack and More: Woodstock
THE BYRDS . . . . . Chimes Of Freedom . . . . . The Byrds
THE HIGH DIALS . . . . . Morning’s White Vibration . . . . . A New Devotion
AL KOOPER . . . . . Brand New Day . . . . . Easy Does It
DR. DOG . . . . . We All Belong . . . . . We All Belong
FOUNTAINS OF WAYNE . . . . . Peace And Love . . . . . Welcome Interstate Managers
ELVIS COSTELLO & THE ATTRACTIONS . . . . . (What’s So Funny ’Bout) Peace, Love And Understanding . . . . . Armed Forces
JOE HENRY . . . . . Our Song . . . . . Civilians

SLY & THE FAMILY STONE . . . . . Medley: Dance To The Music/Music Lover/I Want To Take You Higher . . . . . Music from the Original Soundtrack and More: Woodstock
FUNKADELIC . . . . . One Nation Under A Groove . . . . . One Nation Under a Groove
PETE ROCK & C.L. SMOOTH . . . . . All The Places . . . . . The Best of Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth: Good Life
LUSHLIFE . . . . . Another Word For Paradise . . . . . Cassette City
STEVIE WONDER . . . . . Don’t You Worry ’Bout A Thing . . . . . Innervisions
CACHAO Y SU RITMO CALIENTE . . . . . Mungo Mungo Baby . . . . . From Havana to New York
WAR . . . . . Low Rider . . . . . Why Can't We Be Friends?
SANTANA . . . . . Soul Sacrifice . . . . . Music from the Original Soundtrack and More: Woodstock

THE WHO . . . . . Sparks . . . . . The Kids Are Alright
THE WHO . . . . . Pinball Wizard . . . . . The Kids Are Alright
JOE STRUMMER & THE MESCALEROS . . . . . Coma Girl . . . . . Streetcore
DAVID BOWIE . . . . . Memory Of A Free Festival . . . . . Space Oddity
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Mr. Tambourine Man . . . . . Bringing It All Back Home
NEIL YOUNG . . . . . Roger And Out . . . . . Living with War
JONI MITCHELL . . . . . Woodstock . . . . . Ladies of the Canyon

This one coincided with the 40th anniversary of the Woodstock Music & Arts Fair, so we heard a few tunes from some of the bands who played during those three days up at Yasgur's Farm. Even 40 years on, I'm still blown away by the sounds Jimi Hendrix produced on his guitar for his unique rendition of "The Star Spangled Banner"—from the planes screaming across the sky to the exploding bombs to the machine gun fire, he dropped us right into the horrors of the Vietnam War even as we were hearing our nation's national anthem. It is an astonishing juxtaposition of sounds and images. From there we heard a quartet of tunes from the Byrds (covering Bob Dylan), the High Dials, Al Kooper and Dr. Dog that seem to capture the sensations of freedom and community that many people experienced at the festival. Then one each from Fountains of Wayne and Elvis Costello & the Attractions that certainly fit, which led us to Joe Henry and a tune that reflects the unease people have been feeling about the direction of this country in the first decade of the 21st century.

The next section began and ended with tracks from Sly & the Family Stone and Santana; I've always thought their performances were among the best at the entire event and certainly did as much as anything else to boost the careers of those bands. In between we heard Funkadelic with an appropriately titled tune followed by a couple of hip hop tracks—one from the '90s by Pete Rock and C.L. Smooth and another from Lushlife with a similar appeal that just came out last month. From there it was on to Stevie Wonder adding a little bit of Latin funk to the mix, which was followed by Cachao (aka Israel Lopez) with his Cuban-African mashup and War with a big one for them from the mid-'70s.

Another band that put on a powerful show was the Who; they hit the stage in the early morning hours of Sunday an proceeded to play the entire Tommy album, which had been released a few months earlier. We heard a couple of tracks from that performance, and then it was on to tunes from Joe Strummer & the Mescaleros and David Bowie that are both about attending music festivals. Bob Dylan contributed his classic about following your wonderlust, which led to Neil Young from a few years back reminiscing about, among other things, the Hippie Highway, and then Joni Mitchell closed it out with the tune she wrote immediately after Woodstock was over that captured the essence of the whole experience as well as anybody ever has.

Here's another one from the Who


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