Program #593

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
SONIC YOUTH . . . . . Malibu Gas Station . . . . . The Eternal
MISSION OF BURMA . . . . . Max Ernst’s Dream . . . . . Onoffon
ROBERT POLLARD . . . . . Supernatural Car Lover . . . . . Normal Happiness
LOVE IS CHEMICALS . . . . . Over Land Over Sea . . . . . Song of the Summer Youth Brigade
THE NAZZ . . . . . Open My Eyes . . . . . Nuggets: Original Artyfacts From the First Psychedelic Era 1965-1968
SUPER FURRY ANIMALS . . . . . Where Do You Wanna Go . . . . . Dark Days/Light Years
PETER BJORN AND JOHN . . . . . Just The Past . . . . . Living Thing
PAUL MCCARTNEY . . . . . Let ’Em In . . . . . At The Speed Of Sound

BETTYE LAVETTE . . . . . Ain’t That Lovin’ You Baby . . . . . Change Is Gonna Come Sessions
T=BONE WALKER . . . . . Why Not . . . . . T-Bone Blues
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . That’s How Strong My Love Is . . . . . Out of Our Heads
CAMERA OBSCURA . . . . . My Maudlin Career . . . . . My Maudlin Career
MARILYN MONROE . . . . . I’m Through With Love . . . . . Anthology
THE SUPREMES . . . . . You Can’t Hurry Love . . . . . Motown: The Classic Years
EELS . . . . . Beginner’s Luck . . . . . Hombre Lobo: 12 Songs of Desire
NEIL YOUNG . . . . . Be With You . . . . . Are You Passionate?
BOOKER T. . . . . . Space City . . . . . Potato Hole

MIKE NESS . . . . . Rest Of Our Lives . . . . . Cheating at Solitaire
DEER TICK . . . . . Friday XIII . . . . . Born On Flag Day
THE WHITE STRIPES . . . . . It’s True That We Love One Another . . . . . Elephant
PORTER WAGONER & DOLLY PARTON . . . . . Better Move It On Home . . . . .
JOHN DOE . . . . . The Golden State . . . . . A Year in the Wilderness
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN . . . . . Working On A Dream . . . . . Working on a Dream
GLEN CAMPBELL . . . . . Wichita Lineman . . . . . The Legacy (1961-2002)
RICHARD HAWLEY . . . . . The Nights Are Cold . . . . . Late Night Final
ISOBEL CAMPBELL & MARK LANEGAN . . . . . Something To Believe . . . . . Sunday at Devil Dirt
ROD STEWART . . . . . Reason To Believe . . . . . Every Picture Tells a Story

GRIZZLY BEAR . . . . . Ready, Able . . . . . Veckatimest
ST. VINCENT . . . . . The Bed . . . . . Actor
PAUL SIMON . . . . . Another Galaxy . . . . . Surprise
JOHN CALE . . . . . Zen . . . . . Hobo Sapiens
THE BEATLES . . . . . Tomorrow Never Knows . . . . . Revolver (Remastered)
ROBYN HITCHCOCK & THE VENUS 3 . . . . . I’m Falling . . . . . Goodnight Oslo
THE KINKS . . . . . Wonder Boy . . . . . The Kink Kronikles

This one opened with a Sonic Youth track from their latest that features some of the dynamic kinetic energy they've managed to maintain for decades; it was followed by tunes from Mission of Burma and Robert Pollard with a similar feel, although Pollard's song has a bit more of a melodic touch. That continued with one from Love Is Chemicals, and then it was back to the '60s for the Nazz, Todd Rundgren's first band to gain any attention, mostly through the tune we heard here. Super Furry Animals increased the brightness quotient, and then it was Peter Bjorn and John with a rhythmically appealing track from their latest that immediately conjured up an old Paul McCartney tune from the Wings days.

The remarkable Bettye LaVette has a new six-song EP that is available only as a digital release, and on it she covers on old Jimmy Reed tune, which was followed here by T-Bone Walker doing that easy swinging blues that he did so well. Then it was the Rolling Stones from the early days covering a tune most associated with Otis Redding followed by Camera Obscura with the title track from their excellent recent album of sad songs about a relationship heading off the rails. Marilyn Monroe took that idea to its logical conclusion with a song she performed in Some Like It Hot, and then it was the Supremes not only not giving up but impatient for love. A new one from Eels features a very similar bass line, and from there we had Neil Young paying homage to Booker T. & the MG's and the Stax sound of Memphis followed by Booker T. from his new disc where he's joined by Neil along with the Drive-By Truckers.

Mike Ness from his first disc without Social Distortion got this section off to a rollicking start with a nice bit of rockabilly, and from there we had a quartet of tunes featuring vocals shared by a man and a woman. They began with Deer Tick joined by Liz Isenberg, moved on to one with a lighthearted touch from the White Stripes with Holly Golightly (actually both Jack and Meg White were on vocals, so a bonus girl on that one), got even dumber with Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton (sorry, I couldn't resist) and finished with a great rocker from John Doe along with Kathleen Edwards. The loving yet realistic relationship described in that tune could easily be the dream that Bruce Springsteen is working on, and from the first time I heard it something in that one brought up Glen Campbell's late '60s hit. Richard Hawley's tune also works that way as well, and the sadness in that one carried on to the Isobel Campbell & Mark Lanegan tune that followed before Rod Stewart covering Tim Hardin brought a touch of optimism to the close.

Tracks from the new Grizzly Bear and St. Vincent albums offered a beautifully moody start to this final set, and from there Paul Simon sent us out into the universe and John Cale did the same, although by means of a different path. A song by the Beatles reflecting John Lennon's perusal of the Tibetan Book of the Dead led to Robyn Hitchcock & the Venus 3 in freefall followed by the Kinks celebrating the magic that is life, which seemed like a fine place to bring down the curtain.

Here's another one by Marilyn Monroe


Program #592

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
KENNY RANKIN . . . . . I’ve Just Seen A Face . . . . . Song for You
THE BEATLES . . . . . Real Love . . . . . Anthology 2
GRIZZLY BEAR . . . . . I Live With You . . . . . Veckatimest
THE SHINS . . . . . The Past And Pending . . . . . Oh, Inverted World
EELS . . . . . That Look You Give That Guy . . . . . Hombre Lobo: 12 Songs of Desire
THE WOODEN BIRDS . . . . . Bad . . . . . Magnolia
NEIL YOUNG . . . . . Old Man . . . . . Harvest

NICK LOWE . . . . . Poor Side Of Town . . . . . The Convincer
THE EVERLY BROTHERS . . . . . Cathy’s Clown . . . . . All-Time Original Hits
CAMERA OBSCURA . . . . . Swans . . . . . My Maudlin Career
TEENAGE FANCLUB . . . . . Falling Leaves . . . . . Man-Made
THE LOVIN’ SPOONFUL . . . . . Six O’clock . . . . . The Lovin' Spoonful - Greatest Hits
THE MINDERS . . . . . Accidental Joy . . . . . It's a Bright Guilty World
THE FOO FIGHTERS . . . . . Big Me . . . . . Foo Fighters
NEKO CASE . . . . . People Got A Lotta Nerve . . . . . Middle Cyclone
A.C. NEWMAN . . . . . The Heartbreak Rides . . . . . Get Guilty

JARVIS COCKER . . . . . I Never Said I Was Deep . . . . . Further Complications
SNAKEFINGER . . . . . The Model . . . . . Greener Postures/Chewing Hides the Sound
THE VELVET UNDERGROUND . . . . . All Tomorrow’s Parties . . . . . The Velvet Underground & Nico
SONIC YOUTH . . . . . Massage The History . . . . . The Eternal
IT HUGS BACK . . . . . Soon . . . . . Inside Your Guitar
WILCO . . . . . Radio Cure . . . . . Yankee Hotel Foxtrot

ART BRUT . . . . . Mysterious Bruises . . . . . Art Brut vs. Satan
THE SPECIALS . . . . . Friday Night Saturday Morning . . . . . The Singles Collection
JOHN DOE & THE SADIES . . . . . Night Life . . . . . Country Club
HOLLY GOLIGHTLY . . . . . Keeping On . . . . . Slowly But Surely
DEER TICK . . . . . Houston, TX . . . . . Born On Flag Day
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Early Morning Rain . . . . . Self Portrait
SHARON JONES & THE DAP-KINGS . . . . . It Hurts To Be Alone . . . . . Causes 2
KING CURTIS . . . . . Soul Serenade . . . . . Soul Shots: 60's Soul Classics

Upon hearing of Kenny Rankin's recent passing, I wanted to take a moment to acknowledge his life and career. His music takes me back to the early '70s, when freeform radio was still available on the commercial FM dial and the Kenny Rankins of the world were stretching my listening boundaries. He was especially noted for his interpretations of Beatles music, which did reimagine the tunes he chose in ways that were virtually unprecedented up to that time. We began with one from his last disc and followed it with one of the two tracks created by Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr on top of John Lennon demos from the mid-to-late '70s that, considering the circumstances, ended up sounding remarkably like the Beatles. From there it was Grizzly Bear with a tune featuring a short synthesizer intro that recalls mid-period Beatles, and then it was the Shins shifting the emphasis of the previous tunes from love in bloom to regret and despair. A new one from Eels brought on a touch of wishful envy, followed by the Wooden Birds lamenting what could have been; that one sounds enough like Neil Young's old classic that I couldn't resist hearing them back to back to finish up.

The next section began with Nick Lowe's remake of an old Johnny Rivers tune flowing into one of the Everly Brothers biggest hits, which was conjured up by the Camera Obscura track that followed. Sometimes that happens upon first listen, but in this case it was only after living with the new disc for awhile that the Everly Brothers tune popped into my brain. From there we had Teenage Fanclub with a tune featuring something of a staccato keyboard hook that segued beautifully into an old Lovin' Spooful favorite that is built on a very similar rhythm, except it's on guitar. The Minders followed with a nice of bit of energetic pop that bears a certain resemblance to the Foo Fighters track that followed, which led to a couple of tracks from the New Pornagraphers personnel who earlier this year put out solo discs.

This section only contained six tracks, and the first three grew out of Jarvis Cocker's assessment of himself, which led to Snakefinger covering a Kraftwerk tune followed by the Velvet Underground with Nico intoning Lou Reed's lyrics about the lives and times he observed in the mid-'60s at Andy Warhol's Factory. From there the emphasis shifted to sound, as an extended Sonic Youth track that ebbs and flows gave way to It Hugs Back in more of an ambient mode and Wilco occupying a similar place while in search of a remedy for what ails.

A couple of tunes from Art Brut and the Specials about the effects of hard partying and late nights kicked off this final section, and then it was John Doe & the Sadies covering Willie Nelson looking at it all from the perspective of many years down the road. The trebly twang they gave that one was echoed in the Holly Golightly track that followed as she offered a chance to start over, and then Deer Tick maintained the sound even as they decided that moving on was the better alternative. Bob Dylan covering Gordon Lightfoot injected a mood of lonely isolation, and then it was Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings emphasizing the lonely with an old-school soul ballad that flowed perfectly into an old instrumental hit from King Curtis to close this one out.

Here's another one from King Curtis


Program #591

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . Route 66 . . . . . England's Newest Hitmakers
THE SIR DOUGLAS QUINTET . . . . . Mendocino . . . . . The Best of Doug Sahm & the Sir Douglas Quintet 1968-1975
HANK WILLIAMS III . . . . . Atlantic City . . . . . Badlands: A Tribute To Bruce Springsteen's Nebraska
JOHN DOE & THE SADIES . . . . . Detroit City . . . . . Country Club
BOB DYLAN . . . . . If You Ever Go To Houston . . . . . Together Through Life
ELVIS COSTELLO . . . . . Sulphur & Sugarcane . . . . . Secret, Profane and Sugarcane

PATRICK WOLF . . . . . Hard Times . . . . . Bachelor (Battle One)
YOKO ONO . . . . . Yes, I’m A Witch . . . . . Yes, I'm a Witch
MAGIC WANDS . . . . . Kiss Me Dead . . . . . Magic, Love and Dreams EP
STAR . . . . . Liars In Love . . . . . Devastator
T. REX . . . . . Metal Guru . . . . . The Slider
SUPERGRASS . . . . . Rebel In You . . . . . Diamond Hoo Ha
DAVID BOWIE . . . . . TVC15 . . . . . Station to Station
SUPER FURRY ANIMALS . . . . . Helium Hearts . . . . . Dark Days/Light Years

BON IVER . . . . . Bracket, WI . . . . . Dark Was the Night
ELIZABETH & THE CATAPULT . . . . . Right Next To You . . . . . Taller Children
ROBERT WYATT . . . . . Love . . . . . Uncut Presents: Instant Karma 2002; a Tribute to John Lennon
FRANK SINATRA . . . . . Nature Boy . . . . . Sinatra Rarities-Columbia Years
GRIZZLY BEAR . . . . . Fine For Now . . . . . Veckatimest
THE BLUES PROJECT . . . . . Steve’s Song . . . . . The Best of the Blues Project
ST. VINCENT . . . . . Black Rainbow . . . . . Actor
THE BEATLES . . . . . A Day In The Life . . . . . Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Remastered)

SONIC YOUTH . . . . . Antenna . . . . . Tom Verlaine
TOM VERLAINE . . . . . Breakin’ In My Heart . . . . . Tom Verlaine
NEIL YOUNG & CRAZY HORSE . . . . . Love To Burn . . . . . Ragged Glory
JARVIS COCKER . . . . . Hold Still . . . . . Further Complications
THE FACES . . . . . Debris . . . . . A Nod is As Good As a Wink to a Blind Horse
HEADLESS HEROES . . . . . Just Like Honey . . . . . The Silence of Love

Inspiration for this opener came from the Elvis Costello track that finished it off, essentially a travelogue of ribald escapades concocted by Elvis and his co-writer T-Bone Burnett. So directly preceding it we had a trio of city destinations from Bob Dylan, John Doe and the Sadies and Hank Williams III. The Sir Douglas Quintet was in there with an ode to a place I finally had a chance to visit last year; it's a distinctive little town perched on the edge of the Pacific Ocean and is certainly a worthy inspiration for a song. At the top it was the Rolling Stones great swinging/rockin' version of the old tune about a road that doesn't really exist anymore, but in its day inspired not just one but two songs, as the opening of every Lucky Dog Radio program makes abundantly clear.

A change of pace here to the one from Patrick Wolf's new disc that sets the tone for the journey that follows led to the title tune from the Yoko Ono disc where she offered an eclectic range of musicians and producers an opportunity to rethink and remake a selected track of their own choosing. From there it was Magic Wands with a song that reminded me of an original Ono tune, which led to Star, a band from Chicago whose noisy, melodic tracks are very appealing. A bit of traditional hard rock glam from T. Rex followed, and then it was Supergrass with one ending in some "Oh Oh Oh Oh's" that segued quite nicely into the David Bowie tune that begins in a similar place before one from the latest Super Furry Animals disc finished it off.

Next up was the intimately eclectic folk sound of Bon Iver followed by one with a lush pop appeal from the new Elizabeth & the Catapult disc. A line from that tune quotes the Beatles "A Day In The Life"; here it was followed by a flickering version of a John lennon tune by Robert Wyatt. That led to an early Frank Sinatra track that has him accompanied by a group of choral singers whose spooky vocals flowed rather well into Grizzly Bear's intricately layered harmonies. Then we had a Blues Project tune by Steve Katz with a bit of a Baroque feel followed by a St. Vincent track that starts a quite lovely place but slowly builds to desperate climax, recalling none other than the aforementioned Beatles tune that closes out Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

I'm finding the new Sonic Youth album to be particularly accessible, although I can't tell if it's my mood or the disc itself (probably a little of both); here we began with a track that brought to mind Tom Verlaine from his first solo disc after the original demise of Television, and then it was some more guitars with Neil Young & Crazy Horse offering one of their extended specialties. The mood grew more pensive with a Jarvis Cocker track that features some prominent bass guitar flowing into an sadly beautiful tune from the Faces before a Headless Heroes cover of a Jesus and Mary Chain favorite brought the curtain down.

Here's another one from Elvis Costello


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